Course Catalog | Department of International Relations and Governance Studies

Course Catalog

INT102
Global Hist.& Intl. Relations
4.00
Undergraduate
Course description not available.
INT104
Intl.Orgs. & Global Governance
4.00
Undergraduate
Course description not available.
INT105
Theorizing Intl. Relations
4.00
Undergraduate
The objective of the course is to introduce students to state of the art theoretical scholarship in the discipline of International Relations. It engages the canon as well as critical and alternative approaches to theorising world politics. The fundamental premise underlying the exposure to theories of international relations is a clear recognition that theories are not produced in a vacuum. It is important to acquire a robust sense of the context in which theories are produced, the questions and intellectual currents theorists respond to when they frame their theories and ultimately how theories fare over time in terms of their explanatory claims. Intellectual history is an indispensable ally here to demonstrate how theories are squarely anchored in diverse intellectual lineages that both inform and shape their trajectories. The tack I adopt here is to view diverse rubrics – race, class, gender, caste, order, justice, legitimacy, institutions, security, power, war and peace from multiple perspectives all with the intent of equipping students to theorize diverse facets of world politics.
INT131
Cities of the Global South
4.00
Undergraduate
Course description not available.
INT142
Gender in Intl. Relations.....
4.00
Undergraduate
Course description not available.
INT202
Interrogating Histories.......
4.00
Undergraduate
This course aims to introduce undergraduate students to key concepts, themes, and debates in economic development. It begins with an exploration of the genesis of the idea of ‘development’ itself, engaging critically with the meaning of the term and varied development theories as they evolved overtime, from a focus on income alone to broader understandings of human well-being. In particular, the role of the state and the market, including the role of various schools of thinking (for example, the Chicago School) and key global institutions and actors (Bretton Woods institutions, such as the IMF and the World Bank), in shaping and influencing the discourse and architecture of development policy and practice will be explored. An understanding of the changing goals, approaches, and debates around conceptualisations and measurement of growth, poverty, human development and inequality will follow. The course will also examine theories of dual economy models; industrialisation, trade strategy and industrial policy and so on. Illustrative empirical sites for this course include, inter alia, evidence from East Asia and India.
INT133
Understanding China
4.00
Undergraduate
China is India’s largest neighbour, the world’s second-largest economy and rising rapidly in political influence globally, including in India’s near and extended neighbourhood. Despite these facts, China remains poorly understood and inadequately studied in India. Perceptions tend towards the negative and stereotypical based on the history of the short border conflict of 1962 or altogether brief encounters through movies and the news media. What is more, the recent record of India-China relations as highlighted in Indian media –Chinese transgressions at the disputed boundary, and China’s position on terrorism or on India’s accession as a permanent member of the UN Security Council among others – reinforce some of these perceptions. Clearly, China is receiving increasing attention in India but are its actions, motivations, and intentions being understood properly? This course offers a broad-brush introduction to Chinese history, society, and politics as well as perspectives on India-China relations, specifically and Chinese foreign policy, more generally, towards this end.
INT145
Agri-Food Systems:............
4.00
Undergraduate
Course description not available.
INT201
Global Political Thought
4.00
Undergraduate
Course description not available.
INT203
Knowing & Governing.......
4.00
Undergraduate
Today, C trading is an accepted governance mechanism for climate change mitigation. Is it the best option available? What are governments (developed and developing countries) bargaining about if there are other options? What is the trade logic that enables waste from wealthy developed countries to be shipped to other poor countries? To understand these questions we need to know what leads us to formulate them this way. This course introduces the fundamental disciplines that help us understand ecosystems and economies. It explores the concepts, theories and frameworks used to understand both, and asks why we use knowledge from one discipline (economics) to govern both. The environmental social sciences, their origin and evolution in the 20th century leads us to the STS turn in all of them. Why is this knowledge politics important for national and inter- or trans-national decision making about the environment? Human populations have evolved from one ecosystem to another, understanding, controlling and using exosomatic resources for economic and social gain. The course gives an overview of how local and global ecosystems, economic activities and exchanges/trade and their mutual dependencies have evolved over the 18th to the 20th century. As civilizations moved on to new resources when one became scarce, got degraded or became inaccessible, they also evolved new knowledge politics and governance mechanisms to access and control these new resources. Our prevalent knowledge of planetary and niche ecosystem sustainability demand a thorough rethinking. The environmental social sciences that help us value and govern (land, water, air and biodiversity based) production and consumption activities in the 21st century, may be the best starting point.
INT242
Freedom: A Phil. Investigation
4.00
Undergraduate
Course description not available.
INT250
China in Global Politics
4.00
Undergraduate
China’s rise in global influence is the result of not just over 40 years of economic reforms and opening up but also of its willingness to put the resources it has gained in the process to political use. China has, thus, become an active player in international politics gradually increasing its sphere of activities from its immediate neighbourhood in East Asia in ever widening arcs outwards. These have included the development of wide-ranging bilateral diplomatic relations, greater participation in existing regional and global multilateral institutions, and the expansion of its military capabilities. Along the way, and especially in the last half decade or so, China has differentiated itself ever more sharply from the rest of the world, challenging, in particular, dominant Western narratives and norms on a range of issues from economic development to international law and civil rights. In addition to participating in and seeking a greater say in existing global institutions, Beijing is now creating new international institutions under its own leadership as a way of setting itself up as an alternative to the United States, which it sees as its principal rival. This course looks at the both the process of China’s rise in global politics as well as the factors behind this rise, domestic as well as external.
INT239
Democracy and its Discontents
4.00
Undergraduate
Course description not available.
INT101
Intro. to Intl. Relations
4.00
Undergraduate
This course introduces students to the building blocks of the disciplinary (IR-oriented) study of international affairs. It covers the following key themes: the distinctiveness of the international as a dimension of social reality; the features that make IR a social science; the key concepts and theoretical perspectives for studying world affairs; and key issues and ideas that shape the contemporary international landscape.
INT254
Bearing Witness: .........
4.00
Undergraduate
War is an enduring concern in the study of International Relations. Questions relating to the causes of war, the manner of its unfolding, the toll it exacts on diverse participants, the conspicuous and not so conspicuous silences surrounding conflicts that morph into full-fledged wars and the eliminability of war or the impossibility of any such venture are germane to any serious study of war. A pioneering war correspondent Martha Gellhorn evocatively termed this massive enterprise in a classic book of hers as ‘the face of war’. The objective of this course is to introduce students to these dimensions across a wide gamut of political theatres. It is an invitation to engage with the best reportage on war from around the world. It provides an opportunity to inform ourselves of particular cases or contexts and potentially also learn more about the generic nature of war. Our cases are drawn from a wide repertoire of human involvement in war – from parts of Asia, Africa, Europe, North and South America and the Arab world.
INT103
India in world Affairs
4.00
Undergraduate
Course description not available.
INT237
Translocal/Transnational......
4.00
Undergraduate
Course description not available.
INT232
Agric. in/vs Environment:.....
4.00
Undergraduate
Course description not available.
IRG201
Global Political Thought
4.00
Undergraduate
Course description not available.
IRG104
International Organizations and Global Governance
4.00
Undergraduate
International Organizations and Global Governance
IRG105
Theorizing International Relations
4.00
Undergraduate
Theorizing International Relations
IRG103
India in World Affairs
4.00
Undergraduate
India in World Affairs
IRG101
Sci., Tech. and Devel. Policy
3.00
Undergraduate
Science, Technology and Development Policy
IRG102
Intro to International Devel.
3.00
Undergraduate
COURSE CONTENT: Overview This course aims to introduce undergraduate students to key concepts, themes, and debates in international development, with an underlying emphasis thoughout on the issue of inequality along various dimensions. It begins with an exploration of the genesis of the idea of ‘development’ itself, engaging critically with the meaning of the term and varied development theories as they evolved overtime. An understanding of the changing goals, approaches, and debates around growth, poverty and human development, will follow. A look at important factors in the human development process – for example, achievements in public good sectors key to the equality of opportunity, such as health and education, as well as axes of horizontal and structural inequality, such as caste, gender and ethnicity - will then be explored in the context of India. The country’s performance, in comparative perspective (sub-nationally, regionally and with other Asian economies), will be discussed. The role of various schools of thinking and key global institutions and actors in shaping and influencing the discourse and architecture of development policy and practice will be explored throughout. The course will conclude with a brief overview of the constraints that India faces in the recessionary and globalised context of today. 16 weeks, two 1.5 hour classes each week. ASSESSMENT SCHEME: Component Weightage In class, closed book, short answers 20 Group presentation 20+20 (one in each half of the term, or a single one for 40) Mid-semester written assignment 20 End-semester written assignment 20
IRG106
Governing Ecosystems&Economies
3.00
Undergraduate
The course aims to: 1. Give students an exposure to the major disciplines and inter-disciplinary formations that helps us understand natural and (human) economic functions and their relationships; 2. Enable an understanding of fundamental concepts as used in ecology/environmental sciences, in economics, and in a range of environmental social sciences; 3. Develop an appreciation of the use of these in the governance or management of ecosystems and economies; especially the use of “ecosystem services” and valuation of these services that nature provides for human beings; 4. Develop the language and skills needed to articulate, analyse and discuss the opportunities and tensions between the environment and development; or between ecosystems and economies. This course is divided into two parts or modules: 1. Ecology and Economics: Ecology: definition, emergence, evolution, governance: Beginning with Haeckle, Darwin, and studying Odum’s fundamentals of ecology. Environment – the basic natural sciences; and Ecology – the ‘link between the natural and social sciences’. Economics: definition, emergence, evolution, governance: Beginning with the classical and neo-classical and Marxist - Concepts and theories of value; Energy, labour, capital, types and assumed typologies of capital. Fundamental concepts as used in different disciplines – and their meanings within each discipline: Concepts of production, consumption, energy, inputs/factors, growth, development, externality, time, evolution, sustainability, resilience, and adaptation, risk, uncertainty and ignorance. 2. The environment in economics and the environmental social sciences: Ecosystem services: emergence of the metaphor, the agenda-setting concept it has become now, use in decision-making and governance. Basics of Human Ecology (as related to and shaped by a range of inter-disciplinary studies, which are now established disciplines with their own institutional arrangements) in Ecological Economics, Political Ecology, Environmental Ethics, Ethno-biology, Agro-ecology, Environmental History, Environmental Sociology, Industrial ecology, and Urban ecology. Governance mechanisms: Green accounting: national income accounting, social metabolism – national and global environmental conflicts, payment for ecosystem services, carbon trading and other governance mechanisms
IRG107
Pol Economy of Urban Waste
3.00
Undergraduate
Cities of the global South, especially of a rapidly urbanising India, have their own specificities in terms of the nature of poverty, deprivation and marginality, ‘informality’ and work, ‘illegality’, settlements, peripheries and subaltern urbanism. Within the linear developmentalist perspective of, and literature on, the adequate service delivery of waste, water and sanitation, challenges highlighted include issues around the quantity and quality of supply (plus public health externalities or a lack thereof); highly differentiated and fragmented access, by caste, class, colony; as well as informal and self-provision modalities dominating the formal delivery of services. This course will introduce students to key concepts and theories, germane to an institutional and political economy understanding of the urban in the global South. It will use the domain of waste, water and sanitation and case studies to illustrate certain equilibriums, dynamics, and failures in governance. The course will also study the trajectory of policy reform in these areas, for example, the High Powered Expert Committee and the Jawaharlal Nehru National Urban Renewal Mission (JNNURM), SBM (Swachh Bharat Mission), and so on, which lay stress on an increasing role for public private partnerships (PPPs) and large international companies, but whose reality maybe more divergent and modest than envisaged. The course aims to: 1. Impart knowledge of salient specificities, challenges, and institutional and political economy understandings of the urban in the global South, particularly in the sphere of waste, water and sanitation, pertaining to urban poverty and deprivation, labour markets, environmental sustainability and social justice. 2. Provide knowledge of urban governance, including interaction on policy processes, design and implementation by state and nonstate actors, within the constraints of formal and informal rules and underwritten by asymmetrical power dynamics. 3. Deliver knowledge about key theoretical and conceptual ideas that are germane to the urban waste and water sphere in the global South, such as that of ‘informality’, ‘illegality’, segmented labour markets, interlinked contracts and patron-client relations, transactions costs, property rights, collective action, public goods and externalities etc.
IRG206
Intro International Relations
3.00
Undergraduate
Course Outline Title, code and semester: Introduction to International Relations (IRG206; Monsoon 2017) Description This course provides an in-depth introduction to international relations within the framework of the discipline of International Relations (IR). It covers concepts and theories that help understand and explain international politics. It outlines two competing yet intersecting histories of modern international relations – one emerging from the West, the other from the Non-West. Against this background, an introduction to the international system is provided, which facilitates discussions of key international actors and contemporary issue areas. The course thus adopts a five-fold approach to introducing the field’s key elements. The increasing salience of international affairs on individuals and societies necessitates a systematic appreciation of this dimension of human affairs, and the course provides the tools for this purpose. On opting for this course, students are expected to read and write extensively and take keen interest in the world beyond the boundaries of their society/state. Course Aims 1. To provide students with an in-depth introduction to the key elements in the study of international affairs and familiarization with the field of International Relations (IR). 2. To train students to grasp the complexities of international relations with pertinent case studies and empirical examples, and to enable them to think conceptually and systematically about the dynamics of contemporary world politics. 3. To build in students the capacity to write conceptually and lucidly about foreign policy and international affairs. 4. To develop in students a theory-based problem-solving attitude towards international issues with a view to further studies and onwards to careers in academia, media, policy world and public affairs. Learning Outcomes Upon successful completion of this course, students should be able to: 1. Claim familiarity with the field of IR. 2. Understand the complexities underpinning international relations and how the international shapes significant events such as war and revolution as well as the everyday life of individuals and societies. They should also be able to appreciate, with the help of examples from India and elsewhere, the constraints and opportunities that mark a country’s international conduct. 3. Differentiate between domestic affairs and international politics, as well as understand how the two shape each other. IRG206 Monsoon 2017 2 4. Analyse international relations and write knowledgably and systematically about them with a view to practical application. Course Expectations 1. Attendance and class participation: a minimum of 75 percent attendance is required for students to appear for the final exam. Active participation in the class is very desirable as it enhances understanding and because it is a component of your overall evaluation. (Please note that attendance and class participation carry 10 marks of the total 100.) 2. Reading of essential material is compulsory. Lack of preparation affects the progress of the course and the rhythm of classroom discussions. I will provide the essential reading material. Assessment Assessment for this course will be continuous and will comprise the following: 1. Attendance and class participation – 10 marks 2. Mid-semester exam – 20 marks 3. End-semester exam – 30 marks 4. Review essay/term paper – 20 marks 5. Case studies (2 of 10 marks each) – 20 marks Please note: 1. For no. 4 above, students can select 2-3 books on a theme/topic for a review essay or a topic for a term paper. The word length is 2500-3000. 2. Students can submit up to three case studies, of up to 1400 words each, of which the two best will be considered for grading. Case studies must be based on a course topic and must be designed in consultation with me. 3. Handwritten submissions are necessary for case studies; review essay/term paper submission can be typed. All submissions should be made in hard copy. 4. Students are expected to not plagiarise as it is a crime in academia with serious professional consequences. Please consult me if you are unsure about any aspect of plagiarism. Deadlines: Review essay/term paper is due on 7 November 2017. Case study no. 1 is due on 12 September 2017 and no. 2 on 5 October 2017. Case study no. 3 (optional) can be turned in on any date between 5 October and 7 November 2017. Mid- and end-semester exams will happen on dates within the slots marked in the university’s academic calendar. Deadlines are non-negotiable and late submission will result in grade loss. In case you are unable to submit an assignment on time for legitimate reasons (such as medical, personal emergency, or university duty), delayed submission will be considered against documentary/other suitable evidence. Curriculum Content 1. Concepts and theories – the international and cognate concepts of the political, the global and the world; anarchy and multiplicity as bases of the international; levels of analysis; Realism, Liberalism, Marxism, Constructivism, Postcolonialism, and Feminism as theoretical lenses. 2. Histories – the intertwined histories of modern international relations: western and non-western. Expansion of international society or colonization of the world? IRG206 Monsoon 2017 3 3. The international system – conceptualizations of the international system; system effects on international politics and domestic affairs; constraints and opportunities in state behaviour. 4. Actors – how do states, great powers and empires, international and transnational organizations, individuals (statespersons, diplomats, world leaders) act upon and produce international relations? 5. Issues – western decline and Asian rise; terrorism; crisis of liberal democracies; globalization and nationalism; environmental breakdown; Asian connectivity projects; crisis of diplomacy Schedule Week 1 1 August 2017 – Introduction to IR; key concepts 3 August 2017 – Key concepts continued Week 2 8 August 2017 – Key concepts continued 10 August 2017 – What is a theory? Its features, utility and limitations. Theories of IR introduced: many and rival theories; mainstream and critical theories Week 3 17 August 2017 – Realism – classical Week 4 22 August 2017 – Realism – structural 24 August 2017 – Realism – structural Week 5 29 August 2017 – Liberalism – classical 31 August 2017 – Liberalism – structural Week 6 5 September 2017 – Constructivism 7 September 2017 – Marxism Week 7 12 September 2017 – Feminism 14 September 2017 – Postcolonialism Week 8 19 September 2017 – Histories of international relations – western 21 September 2017 – Histories of international relations – non-western (Asian) Week 9 28 September 2017 – The international system – conceptions and workings IRG206 Monsoon 2017 4 Week 10 3 October 2017 – The international system – American and Chinese visions of world order 5 October 2017 – Actors – states: types (neutral, buffer, pariah, failed, isolated, multilateral, unilateral, failing, honest broker) and goals (survival, security, dominance/hegemony, prestige/status) Week 11 10 October 2017 – great powers (status quo and revisionists) and empires (pre-modern and modern; formal and informal) 12 October 2017 – Actors – international and transnational organizations and world leaders Week 12 24 October 2017 – Issues – global power transition: western decline and Asian rise 26 October 2017 – Issues – contemporary international politics: Asia and the West compared; the two Asian theatres Week 13 31 October 2017 – Issues – the global crisis of liberal democracies 2 November 2017 – Issues – global terrorism Week 14 7 November 2017 – Issues – global terrorism 9 November 2017 – Issues – globalization and nationalism Week 15 14 November 2017 – Issues – globalization and nationalism; environmental breakdown 16 November 2017 – Issues – Asian connectivity projects Week 16 21 November 2017 – Issues – diplomacy in crisis 23 November 2017 – Discussion – IR and the real world Week 17 28 November 2017 – Revision Reading list Required Although any one of the books in the list below will give you a fair idea of the field, a well-rounded perspective will come through a reading of them all. So feel free to devour them from end to end. From the point of view of the course, however, we shall be using select chapters from these books for several of the topics mentioned above. I will make these chapters available well in advance and expect you to read them in preparation to the class. For topics not covered in these books, I will supply the material separately, and those would be either journal articles or IRG206 Monsoon 2017 5 handouts prepared by me. I have kept the article list open so that I can share new research that is accessibly written. Nevertheless, some of the key articles are listed below. Baylis, John and Steve Smith. 2014. The Globalization of World Politics: An Introduction to International Relations, International Sixth Edition. New York: Oxford University Press. Chimni, Bhupinder S. and Mallavarapu Siddharth (eds.). 2012. International Relations: Perspectives for the Global South. Delhi: Dorling Kindersley (Pearson). Jackson, Robert and Georg Sorensen. 2010. Introduction to International Relations: Theories and Approaches. New York: Oxford University Press. Mingst, Karen A. and Ivan A. Arreguin-Toft. 2017. Essentials of International Relations, 7th edition. New York and London: W.W. Norton and Company. Rosenau, James N. and Mary Durfee. 2000. “The Need for Theory” in Thinking Theory Thoroughly: Coherent Approaches to an Incoherent World. Boulder: Westview Press. Rosenau, James N. 1980. “Thinking Theory Thoroughly” in The Scientific Study of Foreign Policy, London: Frances Pinter, pp.19-31. Snyder, Jack. 2004. “One World, Rival Theories.” Foreign Policy, 145, pp.53-62. Sutch, Peter and Juanita Elias. 2007. International Relations: The Basics. Oxon: Routledge. Walt, Stephen M. 1998. “International Relations: One World, Many Theories.” Foreign Policy, 110, pp.29-32+34-36. Wilkinson, Paul. 2007. International Relations: A Very Short Introduction. New York: Oxford University Press. Highly recommended Carr, E.H. 2001. The Twenty Years’ Crisis: An Introduction to the Study of International Relations. First published in 1939. New York: Perennial. I highly recommend this text as it is like no other in the field of IR. It laid the foundation of IR by presenting a dazzling account of the problems, patterns and dynamics of international relations. A lively read that will give you profit and pleasure. Very suitable for the review essay assignment. Recommended Reus-Smit, Christian and Duncan Snidal. 2010. The Oxford Handbook of International Relations. New York: Oxford University Press. A text that brings together all the elements in the field. Should your interest in IR take deep roots, go for this text. You will not regret the time spent on reading it. IRG206 Monsoon 2017 6 IR classics Aron, Raymond. 2003. Peace and War: A Theory of International Relations. Piscataway, NJ: Transaction Publishers. Bull, Hedley. 2002. The Anarchical Society: A Study of Order in World Politics. New York: Columbia University Press. Enloe, Cynthia. 1990. Bananas, Beaches and Bases: Making Feminist Sense of International Politics. Berkeley and Los Angeles: University of California Press. Mearsheimer, John J. 2001. The Tragedy of Great Power Politics. New York: W.W. Norton and Company. Morgenthau, Hans J. 1985. Politics Among Nations: The Struggle for Power and Peace. First published in 1948. New York: McGraw-Hill. Niebuhr, Reinhold. 1932. Moral Man and Immoral Society: A Study in Ethics and Politics. London and New York: Continuum. Waltz, Kenneth N. 1979. Theory of International Politics. Reading, Mass: Addison Wesley. Reference works Diez, Thomas et al. 2011. Key Concepts in International Relations. New Delhi: SAGE Publications. Evans, Graham and Jeffrey Newnham. 1998. Dictionary of International Relations. London: Penguin. Griffiths, Martin and Terry O’Callaghan. 2002. International Relations: The Key Concepts. London: Routledge.
IRG208
Politics: Ancient to Comtempor
3.00
Undergraduate
This course will introduce students to some of the classical writings in political thought. Although some kind of politics, or political institutions, have existed in all the known human settlements, reasoned reflections have brought out distinct understandings of the same in different time- periods and cultures. While ancient Greeks’ reflections on politics and state were subsumed under their inquiries on the nature of the good life, modern contractarian thinkers thought about it, mostly, as an instrumental way of securing peace or as an institutional mechanism to minimize the inconveniences of the ‘state of nature’. One could also say that—though this is a contentious point—different concerns have undergirded political thinking in what we geographically describe as the ‘West’ and the ‘East’. Through reflections on some of the key texts, the course will try to bring out the deeper nuances of our contemporary understanding of politics.
INT601
Theorizing World Politics
4.00
Graduate
Theorizing World Politics
INT602
Comparative Political Theory
4.00
Graduate
Comparative Political Theory